PHIRN: Population Health Improvement Research Network

Call for Proposals

smaller text tool iconmedium text tool iconlarger text tool icon

megahornsBackground on PHIRN Call for Proposals

The Population Health Improvement Research Network (PHIRN) is funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care to support high-quality health research that addresses complex issues that affect health equity and or explores population-based health interventions.

PHIRN is calling for proposals for small research and capacity building grants under its two programmes: Patterns and Pathways of Health Inequities in Ontario and Population Health Interventions in Ontario (details attached). To know more about PHIRN, please visit our website. You must indicate in your application which of the two programmes your proposed research or capacity building activity is most suitable.

Available Funds

The minimum amount one can apply for is $25,000 and the maximum amount is $75,000. Only one application per person will be accepted in the course of a fiscal year.

Deadline for Submission of Proposals

The deadline for the submission of proposals is Tuesday, 16 February 2010. Submissions must be received by midnight, EST.

This application form includes:

  • a summary of the proposed research or capacity building activity (maximum one page)
  • a description of the proposed research or capacity building activity (maximum five pages)
  • a budget and budget justification (maximum one page)
  • a curriculum vitae of the principal applicant (maximum two pages)

Questions

Should you have any questions regarding this call for proposals, please contact Dr. Corinne Packer by phone: 613-562-5800, ext. 8108 or by e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Priority Research Areas for Patterns and Pathways of Health Inequities in Ontario

The research priorities of this programme include:

  1. Exploring the impacts of closing the inequality gap on various outcomes, including health care utilisation, social services utilisation, and disease preventing behaviours. This will aid in an assessment of what economic and social impacts can be expected through efforts such as poverty reduction strategies.
  2. Conducting retrospective and prospective analyses of governmental and non-governmental policies which are likely to have an influence on equity in health and social determinants of health. This will aid in an assessment of the distributional impacts of various policies from the perspective of ‘health in all policies’.
  3. Examining the nature of intersectionality, that is, how various social and cultural categories of discrimination interact on multiple and often simultaneous levels to influence health. This will aid in an assessment of where governments can concentrate efforts to have the greatest impacts.
  4. Exploring citizen engagement and priority setting around health equity policies. This will aid in an assessment of what the public perceives as important, and what opportunities are available for change.
  5. Engaging in effective knowledge transfer and exchange activities (both academic and popular) that will inform the public and policy dialogue on achieving greater health equity by ‘levelling up the bottom.’

For more information on this programme, please visit our website at: Patterns and Pathways of Inequities

 

Priority Research Areas for Population Health Interventions in Ontario

The research priorities of this programme include:

  1. Investigating the effects of complex, population-based interventions on health; that is, interventions that do more than just reduce individual risk and improve individual health, and focus on improving the conditions that determine health risks in order to alter the distribution of risk, as well as risk reduction in successive cohorts of people within a given setting;
  2. Identifying policy levers and investigating the health effects of policy initiatives and other natural experiments, both within and outside the formal health sector, that can improve population health;
  3. Adapting successful population-based policies and programs from other jurisdictions to Ontario, in a way that is timely and highly sensitive to local context, and the impact on vulnerable population sub-groups;
  4. Developing and refining methodologies, data sources and other aspects of the feasibility of conducting rigorous population health intervention research in Ontario;
  5. Building capacity to perform more and better population health intervention studies and to effectively translate and implement population health intervention research knowledge into policy and practice.

For more information on this programme, please visit our website at: Population Health Interventions

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 02 May 2012 10:04 )